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Letter from A. Pierce to Thomas Howland

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@ University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Pierce, A

Description

Visit to Richard and A. Mott. Very acceptable visit by John Wilbur. Abolitionism: believes a failure to oppose slavery conflicts with basic Christian principles; Sarah Grimke's letters in the Liberator will likely make her unpopular with "the gentlemen who claim preeminence on their side." Does not agree that using meetinghouses to lecture on antislavery make them akin to the situation at Alton (the mobbing of Elijah Lovejoy); description of his brother Joseph's house as a way station on the Underground Railroad: "Brother Joseph's house with whom I sojourn a part of the time, [is] one known to fugitives, and many within a year have been refreshed with bread & cheese & the barn when that was safest to escape the pursuer, & sometimes assisted in the darkness of the night with a conveyance to another friend who in turn shall aid him, until he shall arrive at a land where his fetters fall & female sovereignty pronounce him free...
Type:
Text
Format:
Letters (Correspondence)Documents
Contributors:
Howland, Thomas, 1764-1845
Created Date:
1838 04 10
Rights:
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From Collection

Howland Family Papers, 1727-1886 (bulk 1777-1844)

Record Contributed By

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Record Harvested From

Digital Commonwealth