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"Pensacola's Street Car Boycott by Negroes."

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@ Alabama Department of Archives and History, 624 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, Alabama 36130

Description

This article reports that African Americans in Pensacola, Florida, are boycotting street railroads to protest a proposed segregation ordinance. The article argues that while this response is common in cities with similar laws, the boycotts are short-lived and unsuccessful: "The negroes, backed by the exhortations of some of their religious leaders, have invariably declared a boycott, and heroically abandoned their greatest delight, i.e., riding in the cars, but time plays them a trick...Consequently, they resort again to the street cars, finding, to their surprise, that the separation law is actually a very fair provision, giving them rights equal to the whites and assuring observance of them. Then the boycott falls and the negroes patronize the cars as before."
Type:
Text
Format:
Newspapers
Created Date:
1905 05 17
Rights:
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From Collection

Alabama Textual Materials Collection

Record Contributed By

Alabama Department of Archives and History, 624 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, Alabama 36130